Condoms available in a wide variety

For many college students, the holiday season is the time to trek home to visit the family, reap loads of gifts and spend time away from that special someone in life.

Before saying goodbye with a last-of-the-year hop in bed, let’s talk about something that may come between you and your partner – the condom.

Condoms have been around

(Ball State Daily News, Page 8, December 14, 1992) 

By TRACEY TIBBETTS
and DAVID SPEAKMAN
Staff Reporters

For many college students, the holiday season is the time to trek home to visit the family, reap loads of gifts and spend time away from that special someone in life.

Before saying goodbye with a last-of-the-year hop in bed, let’s talk about something that may come between you and your partner – the condom.

Condoms have been around for centuries, although the exact origin of the prophylactic is unclear.

Anthropologists have found evidence which proves ancient cultures used such bizarre materials as tree bark, paper and cloth as preventative measures against conception and disease.

Today, condoms are usually made of one of two substances – latex and natural membrane (usually sheep innards).

Beside the fact that the thought of engaging in intimate activity with a piece of dead animal separating the privates may cause one nausea, this type of condom is ineffective at preventing venereal disease. So the focus of this article is on latex, or truly rubber rubbers.

It is important to use condoms for any sexual activity – including oral sex. This could prevent the embarrassment of a sore throat being diagnosed as a case of oral venereal disease. Herpes also is a risk reduced by condom use.

These latex wonders come in two basic categories: lubricated and non-lubricated. Other, more specialized possibilities exist with features like receptacle ended, fitted, ribbed, colored, flavored/scented, super thin, extra strong and extra large.

  • Non-lubricated condoms are probably best for oral sex. the slimy lubricant included with most condoms is not exactly a taste sensation. But for intercourse, these need a lubricant like KY Jelly or a spermicidal alternative to help prevent painful penetration.
  • Lubricated condoms come with out without spermicide. The most-common spermicide is nonoxyl-9, which is detergent-based. Although nonoxyl-9 is helpful in preventing pregnancy and lowering the risk for sexually-transmitted disease, many people are allergic to the substance. Individuals with soap allergies may ant to beware of possible irritation.

After the choice of lubricated and non-lubricated, the fun begins.

  • Colored condoms (or condoms of color) really don’t add much zing to the act. The effect these have vary with color, for example: green makes a penis look diseased, yellow causes a severe jaundiced look, red provides an angry appearance and blue screams of suffocation.
  • Ribbed, pleasure dotted or “rough rider” condoms are usually billed “for her pleasure.” This phrase is a fallacy. Women are not sexually stimulated by vaginal friction. One writer for Details magazine described sex with ribbed condoms as “getting pumped while going over speed bumps.”
  • Super-thin rubbers, especially the Lifestyles brand, tend to break during active or inventive frolicking.
  • Extra-strong (thick) condoms are like wearing mittens while trying to play piano – it isn’t very fun and leads to random, disharmonious banging.
  • Extra-large should not be used by the mere egomaniac since they may fall off and cause a partner to laugh or may come off inside and cause a partner the embarrassment of digging it out.
  • Flavored/scented condoms help alleviate the monotony associated with prolonged oral sex. They also eliminate that distinctive “balloon flavor” of the average rubber. Mint-flavored condoms let users have fresh breath after the acts – a definite plus if you’ve forgotten your tooth brush.

Specialized features may raise the price of a condom. The cost-conscious consumer may find a plain condom, which averages 50 cents, the best buy.

WIPB cancels homosexual movie

WIPB-TV the campus-based Muncie PBS Affiliate, has decided not to air the controversial dramatization, The Lost Language of Cranes.

Based upon David Levitt’s 1986 best-selling novel of the same name, the tale unfolds as a father and son reveal their homosexuality to each other.

The British movie, directed by Nigel Finch, features gay characters in lead roles. Actors such as Angus

(Ball State Daily News – Thursday, June 25, 1992)

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
Staff Reporter

WIPB-TV the campus-based Muncie PBS Affiliate, has decided not to air the controversial dramatization, The Lost Language of Cranes.

Based upon David Levitt’s 1986 best-selling novel of the same name, the tale unfolds as a father and son reveal their homosexuality to each other.

The British movie, directed by Nigel Finch, features gay characters in lead roles. Actors such as Angus MacFayden, Eileen Atkins, Corey Parker (thirtysomething) and Brian Cox (the original Hannibal Lector in the film Manhunter) round out the cast.

Some scenes that may have led to this decision to stop the telefilm include the portrayal of shirtless men talking in bed and same-gender kissing.

At press time, station officials were unavailable for comment on the last-minute cancellation of an airing scheduled in local listings.

“I’m surprised that it is not showing,” said Kerry Poynter, Lesbian and Gay Student Association internal vice president.

“At first I was surprised that it was listed as showing in Muncie because it had to do with gay issues,” he said.

LGSA members said WIPB has chosen not to air other programs that deal with homosexuality, including the documentary, Tongues Untied

“Gay and lesbian people also donate money to the station and ought to see what they want to see,” Poynter said.

The only Indiana-based station airing the program is the Indiana University-owned PBS affiliate.

“In a college town people tend to be a little more open minded and a large portion of people would be interested in seeing a story like Lost Language of Cranes,” Poynter said. “I’m upset and I’m going to call them. Other people should call Channel 49, too.”

Poynter and other callers to the station last night reached an answering machine.

Other students were not surprised by the decision not to air the critically-acclaimed film.

“I think that this re-validates the point that Muncie is 40 years behind the times and is unwilling to support diversity,” said Robin Schreiber, Student Association director of Communication.

“I don’t understand why Channel 49 is trying to act like a mother for the Muncie community,” said Mike Branham, SA Judicial Court justice. 

Pizza Hut joins food court

Pizza Hut Express will join four other food vendors in the new food court being built this summer to replace Wendy’s restaurant in the Student Center, university officials said.

Although Wendy’s is scheduled to close June 5 with demolition and construction to start soon after, there is no guarantee the food court will be open for

(Ball State Daily News – Front Page (lead story) – May 27, 1992)

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
Staff Reporter

Pizza Hut Express will join four other food vendors in the new food court being built this summer to replace Wendy’s restaurant in the Student Center, university officials said.

Although Wendy’s is scheduled to close June 5 with demolition and construction to start soon after, there is no guarantee the food court will be open for business on the first day of classes, Student Center director Bruce Morgan said.

“We have to rely on independent contractors,” Morgan said. “To speed up the construction process, we’ve broken the demolition and construction into different contracts.”

Burger King will replace Wendy’s as the large food vendor in the court and will feature the full national menu, associate vice president of student affairs Barb Jones said.

Jones said Pizza Hut Express will serve personal pan pizzas and bread sticks, and Taco Bell will provide the students’ top food of choice according to surveys.

“This has been a student-driven effort,” Morgan said.

The idea of a food court in the Student Center dates back seven years to the Wendy’s arrival, Morgan said.

Construction of the food court will separate the outlets into two sections, Burger King and Taco Bell will be on the south side (currently occupied by Wendy’s) with removal of an east wall to accommodate the installation of a Pizza Hut Express. the second area, located on the north side entrance will house Baskin Robbins and Gretel’s Bakery Shop.

Morgan said Gretel’s Bakery will serve pastries, cookies, cinnamon rolls and possible fresh fruit.

“Gretel’s is an in-house bakery. Everything will be fresh,” Jones said. “The bakery will test our market and provide what Ball State wants,” Morgan said.

To give the food court a more open feeling, remodeling of the brown tiled area of the lower level of the first floor will coincide with construction. “We wanted to get rid of the “cave feeling” Jones said.

The remodeling will concentrate on removing non-structural walls and lightening the area, said Jones.

A portion of the first floor corridor will be closed during construction. Jones said there will be a problem getting to On The Ball and special arrangements will be made for disabled students.

Jones and Morgan said disabled individuals should go to the hotel desk and make arrangements to be escorted through the construction area to access On The Ball. Access to Career Services and Student Legal Services may also be affected by construction.

The food court will increase on-campus employment. “ARA(the company managing the restaurants) will be employing students and will be going though Career Services,” said Jones. The company may also work with out food management program to create a program for internships.

“This is jobs for students,” said Morgan. “A lot of ARA managers were former student employees.”

ARA Services is also interested in pursuing an environmentally sound establishment. “They have a very active environmental program,” said Jones. ARA has expressed a desire to tailor its environmental program to suit the campus needs.

OUTLET DISHING OUT FOOD ITEMS

While the food court construction is underway, Dining Services will be providing a food outlet based in the southeast corner of the Tally.

“We move in Monday, June 8,” assistant director of dining services Betty Hays said. She said hours will be 7 a.m. – 1:30 p.m.

From 7-1 a.m. the outlet will be selling breakfast foods. These items include juices, donuts, croissants, muffins, fresh fruit, cereal, coffee, tea, milk, sodas and mineral waters, according to a memo from Liz VanMatre, dining service assistant director of operations.

Also available at this time will be carry-out entrees. “This is so people can buy their lunch in the morning to eat later,” Hays said.

Summer lunch hours start at 11 a.m. and will feature a hot entree that will vary from fried chicken, casseroles and vegetarian lasagna. 

Perot snares 4,600 local signatures

Local Ross Perot supporters collected thousands of signatures in a grass roots effort to put the independent candidate on Indiana’s fall election ballot.

“We collected over 1,500 signatures in the first day,” said Carolyn Wenz, Perot’s Delaware County Coordinator. “During the two weeks we were out, we collected 4,600

(Ball State Daily News – Page 2 – May 14, 1992)

Texas billionaire expected to be on Hoosier fall ballot

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
Staff Writer

Local Ross Perot supporters collected thousands of signatures in a grass roots effort to put the independent candidate on Indiana’s fall election ballot.

“We collected over 1,500 signatures in the first day,” said Carolyn Wenz, Perot’s Delaware County Coordinator. “During the two weeks we were out, we collected 4,600 signatures total.”

To qualify for the Indiana ballot, candidates must collect 29,919 signatures. “Now I believe we are over (the required number of signatures),” Wenz said.

Wenz, a one-time presidential campaign coordinator for Robert Kennedy in 1968, said the country is at a crucial moment. “We are at a crossroads – a make-or-break moment. If this man gets in the White House, we will change the course of history.”

Wenz is not alone in her assessment of the political scene. “The Republicans and the Democrats don’t know how to run the country. It wouldn’t hurt to give Perot a chance,” said Jean Thurman, office manager at WBST radio.

Thurman explained why she signed Perot’s petition. “I didn’t like any of the other candidates. But I did like how Ross Perot came from a poor background and established his business,” she said.

“The choice we have between Bush and Clinton is pathetic,” said Wenz.

“George Bush has forgotten middle America.” Wenz pointed to Bush’s cut of the luxury tax on yachts. “That tax cut really helped me out.”

“Bill Clinton lost his credibility when he said he smoked marijuana and then claimed he never inhaled,” she said. “Yeah, right.”

While many political pundits are writing Perot off as a protest candidate, his supporters say otherwise. “He has a definite chance to win, and I’m not saying that just because I’m working for him,” said Wenz.

“As the summer goes on, Bush will continue to sink in popularity and Clinton will fade away,” Wenz said. “Ross Perot is popular right now and a lot of people don’t even know who he is.”

“Look at the polls,” she said. “He hasn’t officially announced his candidacy and he is winning in Texas and California.

A Verdi Christmas

The second half-century of Texaco-Metropolitan Opera live Saturday afternoon radio broadcasts will begin with Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 8 on WBST-FM 92.1.

The broadcast marks the 5th birthday of the Texaco-Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts, which constitute the longest continuous national sponsorship of a radio program in broadcast history. It was on Dec. 6, 1940, that the very first Texaco-Metropolitan Opera

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
For The Muncie Star  (Page T-15)

The second half-century of Texaco-Metropolitan Opera live Saturday afternoon radio broadcasts will begin with Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 8 on WBST-FM 92.1.

The broadcast marks the 5th birthday of the Texaco-Metropolitan Opera radio broadcasts, which constitute the longest continuous national sponsorship of a radio program in broadcast history. It was on Dec. 6, 1940, that the very first Texaco-Metropolitan Opera broadcast was presented, and the opera that historic afternoon was Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro.

The cast for Saturday’s broadcast of La Traviata will feature three American singers in the major roles: Diana Sovierro as Violetta, Jerry Hadley as Alfredo Germont and Brian Schexnayder as his father, Giorgio Garmont. American conductor Rico Saccani will make his Met broadcast debut leading the performance. The announcer is Peter Allen.

To mark this 50th anniversary, WBST is offering a special 1990-1991 Metropolitan Opera broadcast schedule to the readers of The Muncie Star who read this column. All you need to do is write: WBST, Ball State University, Muncie IN 47306-0550 and ask for your free schedule.

Special Stuff

Last week I mentioned that WBST plans on airing about 40 special programs for the December holiday season. Get ready, because next week they will be listed in an easy-reference format.

Today, however, you’ll get a special preview of our holiday music specials that will air Dec. 11 to 25. During these weeks, WBST offers a variety of special programming.

Western Wind: A Celebration of Light, A Jazz Piano Christmas, Handel’s Messiah at St. Thomas Church, the 1990 St. Olaf Christmas Special and An Acoustic Christmas: Steve Wariner and Friends will evoke reveries and reminiscences, from traditional and contemporary to regional and international.

The history and legend of contemporary religious celebrations are woven together with music in the Dec. 18 hour-long special, Western Wind: A Celebration of Light. The acclaimed Western Wind Vocal Ensemble’s unique repertoire includes music and songs representative of the spirituality and significance of the winter solstice, renaissance and Hanukkah.

America’s original art form is the focus of A Jazz Piano Christmas, a 1-hour Dec. 22 special featuring keyboard specialists Billy Taylor, George Shearing, Marian McPartland and other notables from the jazz world. A Jazz Piano Christmas will use the “let’s-take-it-easy” philosophy of its genre for high-energy celebration.

Two musical events that mark the season’s sacred mood are the production of Handel’s Messiah at St. Thomas Church, hosted by Dudley Moore, and the 1990 St. Olaf Christmas Special: Arise ans Set the Captive Free. These specials will be broadcast Dec. 22 and 24, respectively.

Messiah presents original instruments and a men’s and boy’s choir as specified by the 18th-century composer. The ensemble of soloists and instruments, exquisitely blended by Handel, is under the artistic direction of James Richman.

The St. Olaf Choir joins the St. Olaf Orchestra in the all-new musical event – the 1990 St. Olaf Christmas Special. The 90-minute concert features the world famous 400-voice massed choir and 100-member orchestra conducted by Anton Armstrong.

Dec. 23’s An Acoustic Christmas reaffirms the true American spirit with 2 hours of outstanding performances by some of Nashville’s finest musicians and greatest storytellers. Chet Atkins, Emmylou Harris, Maura O’Connell and othres get together in the city where country and western sound began.

The Woman of Japan

At 5:30 tonight on Horizons, host Vertamae Grosvenor explores the world of the modern Japanese woman. While Japan advances as a world power, women in Japan are still struggling to break free from traditional roles, as seen in tonight’s features, “Women in Japan Speak Out.”

During the past 10 years, many Japanese women have been making changes in the office and at home. This program features women from many walks of life – all reflecting on Japan’s complex society from a feminine point of view.

Coming to America

Every year hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants make the perilous trek across the U.S.-Mexican border, risking arrest, detention and the threat of abuse as they seek refuge and a new life in the north.

According to David Davis of Ball State University’s minority development, the immigration will have a radical impact on the structure of American society. He said that by the turn

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
For The Muncie Star, page T-15

Every year hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants make the perilous trek across the U.S.-Mexican border, risking arrest, detention and the threat of abuse as they seek refuge and a new life in the north.

According to David Davis of Ball State University’s minority development, the immigration will have a radical impact on the structure of American society. He said that by the turn of the century English will be the second language of the majority of Californians. Added to that are projections that within the next century white Americans will become the new minority.

This week, WBST will devote a series of special reports to chronicling the flow of those immigrants into the United States, focusing on the effects of the 1986 Immigration Act, which was designed to solve the immigration debate once and for all.

The stories – which coincide with the fourth anniversary of IRCA becoming law – started Saturday and will continue Monday through next Saturday on Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

At 8 p.,. Saturday, Weekend Edition host Scott Simon takes listeners to the San Diego-Tijuana border, where the largest number of undocumented immigrants cross into North America from Mexico and Central America each day.

“We have wanted to do stories on the border for some time because who can cross and who cannot tells a great deal about how we define America,” Simon said. “By reporting it from the perspective of people who break a fence, dodge trucks, swim through raw sewage and risk assault and robbery from thugs to get here, we saw the relationship between the immigrants and the INS from a different vantage entirely.”

“We witnessed the tensions firsthand, and found there are no easy solutions to the border issue.” said Mandalit del Barco, who produced the Weekend Edition reports. “We kept hearing about how ironic it is that while the walls come tumbling down all over Europe, they’re being built up more and more between the U.S. and Mexico.

At 6 a.m. Monday, Morning Edition host Bob Edwards will begin to examine the ramifications of the passage of IRCA.

  • MONDAY – When IRCA was enacted 4 years ago, 3 million immigrants became eligible for amnesty. In this first Morning Edition piece, NPR reporter Celeste Wesson reports on where those people are today and what their new found legal status has meant to them.
  • TUESDAY – NPR’s Katie Davis reports from Mexico on “The push factor,” the economic conditions in Mexico that force many Central and South Americans across the border in search of better wages and living conditions in the north.
  • WEDNESDAY – NPR’s Isabel Alegria reports from San Francisco on whether or not IRCA has created a deep underclass of those still-undocumented immigrants who have fallen through America’s safety net.
  • THURSDAY – Celeste Wesson reports on how U.S. businesses have been effected by IRCA, which for the first time made it illegal for employers to knowingly hire undocumented workers.
  • Friday – NPR’s Paz Chohen interviews lawmakers, proponents and opponents of expanded immigration, in a report from the nation’s capital on the failure direction of U.S. immigration policy.

“Some have benefited from legalization,” said Wesson of IRCA ramifications, “but, for example, among farm workers legalization hasn’t translated into better working conditions and higher wages.” Wesson visits a north San Diego camp where farm workers – many of whom are documented – live in the woods, in shacks made of plastic scraps.

Wesson says that when the law was passed, employers geared up to face sudden employee shortages and the need to pay a lot more for workers.

Celebrating Copland

Wednesday is Aaron Copland Day at WBST. In honor of his 90th birthday, a special tribute is being paid to one of America’s most beloved composers.

Starting at 1 p.m. on A Copland Celebration: A Keyboard Tribute, pianist Claudia Stevens of the College of William and Mary in Virginia performs a program of piano works by and in tribute to Copland.

The concert also features the works of Virgil Thompson, Leonard Bernstein, David Diamond, Richard Bales, Sheila Silver and Claudia Stevens.

A Copland Celebration: A Concert Band Tribute continues the Copland extravaganza with the united States Coast Guard Band, which will perform original Copland works and transcriptions for band.

Scheduled highlights include a performance of A Lincoln Portrait narrated by Walter Cronkite and Emblems, Copland’s only pure band work.

Adventures in Good Music with Karl Haas adds to the tribute at 7 p.m. A Tribute to Aaron Copland underlines why the composer is considered the dean of American Music.

The birthday bash reaches its climax at 8 p.m. with A Concert in Celebration of Aaron Copland’s 90th Birthday. This is a live broadcast of Minnesota’s Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra.

The Orchestra, under the direction of Peter Bay, will perform Copland’s Music for the Theatre, Quiet Cry, Three Latin American Sketches and Appalachian Spring.

David Speakman is a communications intern for WBST.

Music for Vampires

For quite some time, WBST has been brewing a special Halloween treat for its Friends and listeners. Local performances are to be featured this Wednesday afternoon.

Music From the 1989-90 Ball State University Faculty Series will begin at 2 p.m. Rolf Legbrandt plays clarinet and Mitchell Andrews the piano for Castelnuovo-Tedwsco’s Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, Op. 128. Later in the half-hour

Written for the Muncie Star (Page T-5, October 28, 1990)

For quite some time, WBST has been brewing a special Halloween treat for its Friends and listeners. Local performances are to be featured this Wednesday afternoon.

Music From the 1989-90 Ball State University Faculty Series will begin at 2 p.m. Rolf Legbrandt plays clarinet and Mitchell Andrews the piano for Castelnuovo-Tedwsco’s Sonata for Clarinet and Piano, Op. 128. Later in the half-hour program, George Wolf and Pia Sebastiani play saxophone and piano respectively on Fantasia by Villa-Lobos.

Our focus then turns to the eerie, yet musical. Ever since Bela Lugosi’s first performance of Count Dracula, vampires have been a mainstay of modern culture.

at 3:10 p.m. our Halloween Special presentation of Moonlight Sonata by Memerie Innerarity will be performed.

This is a recording of March’s premiere of Ball State University’s performance of the operetta featuring vampires. The recording was taken in WBST’s Studio B before the show’s first public performance in Muncie.

The story tells how one vampire gets revenge over an old enemy. Featured performers are Michael Jorgensen, Patricia Robertson, Andrea Thomas, Fritz Robertson and pianist Eri Nakagawa.

WOMEN OF ISRAEL

At 5 p.m. today, Horizons presents Daughters of Zion: Women in Israel. For his story, producer Adam Phillips travels to Israel, the land of Golda Meir, to see if “the perception of women’s equality in that country is truth or myth.”

The documentary illustrates how 3,000 years of Jewish tradition has created a confusing atmosphere for Israeli women by encouraging them to maintain child-bearing roles while remaining passive in public life and politics.

Phillips reports that in Israel, attitudes toward women and women’s attitudes about themselves are controversial. “Most everyone in the country has a firm opinion about the woman’s proper role at home, in the workplace, and Jewish ritual life. The conflicts come to a head when women want to read from the Torah Scroll at the holy Wailing Wall in Jerusalem,” he said.

Horizons host Vertamae Grosvenor and Gwendolyn Glenn are co-producers of next Sunday’s Horizons documentary, Myrtle Beach: Parity in Paradise.

Their story focuses on Myrtle Beach, South Carolina’s highly profitable tourism business, the second largest industry in the state, and on the struggles of the area’s African American residents who are trying to gain economic parity within their seaside community.

Despite the millions of tourist dollars that pass through the area each year, Grosvenor and Glenn report that black residents along the 60-mile coastline of this lavish resort area have not received significant financial rewards or career opportunities.

RARE BELLINI

Saturday is Vincenzo Bellini’s birthday. The Best Seat in the House hosts John Meadows and Dick Ver Wiebe celebrate the 189th birthday of the composer.

Seldom recorded Bellini will air at 12:30 p.m. The program will feature unusual operatic recordings from Bellini’s repertoire.

A Fable for Radio

One of the true pleasures of public radio is that it features special programming and takes risks that are cost-prohibitive on television or commercial radio.

Even steadfast public radio programs get into the act.

Saint Paul Sunday Morning will present an unusual and whimsical collaborative work entitled, Little Tricker the Squirrel Meets Big Double the Bear. The special program can be heard on WBST-FM 92.1

(The Muncie Star – Page T-15)

By DAVID SPEAKMAN

One of the true pleasures of public radio is that it features special programming and takes risks that are cost-prohibitive on television or commercial radio.

Even steadfast public radio programs get into the act.

Saint Paul Sunday Morning will present an unusual and whimsical collaborative work entitled, Little Tricker the Squirrel Meets Big Double the Bear. The special program can be heard on WBST-FM 92.1 at 10 a.m. today.

Little Tricker recalls novelist Ken Kesey’s childhood and the Ozark fable his Grandma Smith used to tell him. Kesey narrates the fable with a musical accompaniment scored by composer Arthur Maddox, who grew up in the Ozarks.

Saint Paul Sunday Morning host Bill McGlaughlin conducts the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center for this special performance, with Maddox at the piano. The score brings the animal characters to life, and follows them in their adventures. It promises to be America’s own Peter and the Wolf.

Ken Kesey is perhaps best known for his novel One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, which was made into an Oscar-winning film. Kesey – a onetime wrestling champion – won a scholarship to Stanford, where he studied fiction. His 1986 publication, Demon Box, spans a 20-year period of his writing, bringing together semi-biographical articles and fiction. This work inclused the story Little Tricker the Squirrel Meets Big Double the Bear.

Saint Paul Sunday Morning, the most widely broadcast classical music performance program in the country, features an inviting blend of talented guests, excellent performances and lively conversation.

Art With a Message

At 5:30 p.m. tonight, Horizons continues its look at minorities in America. Producer Elizabeth Perez-Luna presents “Latino Performing Artists: Art for Troubled Times.”

The documentary reveals how these artists are using traditional and non-traditional theatre, dance, music, multimedia elements and other expressions to create connections among art, society and politics.

“This is the first time in which we have Chicanos, Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and Latin Americans talking about the similarities and differences in their approaches to art as rituals for troubled times and as a means to reflect their reality within a multicultural context.” Perez-Luna said.

The documentary was taped at a recent gathering at the Yellwo Spring Institute for Art and Society in Pennsylvania of Latino artists from the United States and Latin America to perform, exchange ideas and collaborate on new works.

A Final Tribute

The late Walter Davis Jr.’s last recording session is featured on this week’s Marion McPartland’s Piano Jazz at 7 p.m. Saturday.

Davis, who  played with Charlie Parker, Max Roach and Dizzy Gillespie, joins McPartland to one of Davis’s main influences with their duet, Blue Monk.

On this special program, the great be-bop stylist also displays his unique sound with his own tune, Backgammon.

Unusual Operas

Classic Tales of doom and death are recounted in three magnificent ground-breaking works this month on NPR World of Opera, National Public Radio’s continuing series of operatic masterpieces from around the United States and the world.

NPR World of Opera has its season premiere on WBST at 12:30 p.m. Saturday. This trio for the Halloween season starts with the production of Philip Glass’s acclaimed

(The Muncie Star – Page T-15)

By DAVID SPEAKMAN

Classic Tales of doom and death are recounted in three magnificent ground-breaking works this month on NPR World of Opera, National Public Radio’s continuing series of operatic masterpieces from around the United States and the world.

NPR World of Opera has its season premiere on WBST at 12:30 p.m. Saturday. This trio for the Halloween season starts with the production of Philip Glass’s acclaimed The Fall of the House of Usher, based on the story by Edgar Allen Poe.

Minimalist composer Glass is one of the most prominent and controversial composers on the international music scene, and is known for revising traditional operatic writing, often incorporating high-tech video electronics into his productions.

Glass’s brooding, atmospheric music takes center stage in this production. David Trombley, Dwayne Croft and Sharon Baker sing the roles of the principal characters who lead listeners through Poe’s horror story about an ancestral curse and a premature burial.

The world premiere of Frankenstein: The Modern Prometheus by Libby Larson has received wide critical acclaim. The opera is based on the haunting 19th-century novel by Mary Shelley. Libby Larson, regarded as one of America’s brightest young composers, created the work as an exploration of intellectual ambition, technological arrogance and isolation. All the music and vocal parts are electronically mixed.

The month concludes with The Flying Dutchman, the dark tale of a legendary voyager, doomed to roam the Earth for eternity until he can find a woman who is willing to faithful to him “until death.” The opera by Richard Wagner is heard in a production from the world-famous Bayreuth Festspielhaus, the venue Wagner built for his works.

Wagner was inspired to write the opera by a sailor’s tale he heard on board a ship on the North Sea in 1839. The work marked the first time Wagner used musical themes or “leitmotivs.” that now are so closely associated with his work. It was also the first time he used the orchestra more as a character itself than as an accompaniment.

Steve Curwood, host of NPR World of Opera, says, “Each of these operas reflects what I regard as opera’s gift – its magnificence as human symphony, with all the passion, cruelty and beauty of life itself.”

The Model Minority

Hard working parents and smart, obedient children who graduate from the best schools and become top professionals – this is the stereotype of Asian Americans, the so-called “model minority.”

“The Chinese American community abounds with examples that seem to bear out the stereotype, but this is only a partial truth,” says Helen Borten, producer of the first October documentary to air on Horizons, at 5:30 tonight on WBST.

Borton’s story is the first of five documentaries to profile various multicultural groups as they struggle for economic, political and social success at home and abroad.

In her story, “Chinese Americans” Climbing the Golden Mountain,” Borten reports from New York City on the success and the heartbreak of Chinese Americans as they pursue the American dream. Borten says, “School dropouts, youth gangs, garment industry sweatshops, cultural isolation and mental illness are also what many Chinese immigrants encounter after they come to America.”

In the next Horizons October documentary, airing at 5:30 p.m. Oct. 14, producer Scott Schlegel spotlights the music of black women composers who struggle for recognition and acceptance in the male-dominated world of classical music.

In “Black Women Classical Composers,” Schlegel reports that getting classical music published is difficult for anyone, but it is especially hard for women. “There is a belief in the world of classical music publishing that women’s compositions are less deep, less emotionally powerful than men’s,” Schlegel says.

In the coming weeks: “Latino Performing Artists: Art for Troubled Times” and “Daughters of Zion: Women in Israel.”

Storytime

At 11:30 a.m. today The Sound of Writing features “Voice From the Outer Banks” by Richard Hill. This story is the tale of  a woman dead for 175 years who still manages to speak. Richard Hill tells this outlandish tale written by the daughter of Aaron Burr.

Ursula K. LeGuin, one of the most popular authors in the genre of speculative fiction, reads “Texts,” a vignette of a woman trying to escape the pretentious communications of today.

This text of an unnerving message tells of the woman, even alone and in silence, everything she sees seems to be at once of this world and another.

Alumnus nominated for national award

(Ball State Daily News – Page 2 – July 5, 1989) 

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
Staff Writer

An alumnus was recently announced to be a finalist for the Indiana Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching.

If Gary Emmert, a Teacher’s College graduate, wins the competition, he could receive a $7,000 grant to be used for classroom needs and a trip to Washington, D.C. to be recognized by President Bush, the Indiana Department

(Ball State Daily News – Page 2 – July 5, 1989) 

By DAVID SPEAKMAN
Staff Writer

An alumnus was recently announced to be a finalist for the Indiana Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching.

If Gary Emmert, a Teacher’s College graduate, wins the competition, he could receive a $7,000 grant to be used for classroom needs and a trip to Washington, D.C. to be recognized by President Bush, the Indiana Department of Education announced.

Emmert was nominated by David Shull, principal of Ben Davis Junior High School in Indianapolis. Shull had previously nominated Emmert for the award in 1988.

“Gary is an outstanding educator. He’s very dedicated and effective at teaching all ability levels. He believes that all kids can learn,” said Shull.

This year Emmert is one of three Indiana finalists for the award in mathematics teaching. State Superintendent of Public Instructions H. Dean Evens said that the winner would be announced during the first week of September.

A national panel of scientists, mathematicians and educators will judge the finalists on the basis of experience, education and professional memberships, recommendations, essays, and proposed use of the awards for classroom activities.

Emmert, nominated for the National Science Foundation award for the second time, works well with others, Shull said. Emmert is also well regarded by fellow teachers. This year he was nominated by his peers for the Wayne Township teacher of the year award.

“Gary is a good team player. He’s no prima donna. He is still humble and admits freely that he learns from those around him,” said Shull.

Emmert also incorporates principles of physics onto his math classes, Shull said. This past year Emmert had his classes do such projects as create a capsule that would protect a raw egg when dropped from the top of the school and design and build boats for a race after the students estimated the amount of water displacement would be caused by the weight of the team.

Emmert also acts as the faculty advisor and founder of the Ben Davis Junior High chapter of Odyssey of the Mind, a national student problem-solving organization.

This year, the team was challenged to come up with a machine that would perform twelve tasks on its own. The team’s gadget won the state championship and placed in the top 15 in the national competition in Boulder, Colo.

The three years of Emmert advising Odyssey of the Mind teams has produced three state championships and placement in the national top 15 twice.

“In the four years that Gary has been at Ben Davis Junior High, he has stood for academic excellence,” Shull said. “I wish we had a school full of teachers like Gary Emmert.”

Emmert is on academic leave for the summer, according to Ben Davis Junior High, and could not be reached by the Daily News for comment.